All posts tagged: #promotionalproductswork

The Branded Merch Revolution Happening Right Under Your Nose

HuluNetflixKFC. Little Caesars. Papa Johns. Chipotle.

What do they each have? 

Swag(ger). 

And lots of it.

The swag revolution is real. To wit: Aldi’s dropped a merch collectionAldi’s. The grocery store. The discount grocery store. 

And over the summer, Panera Bread wanted to increase soup sales in the off-season so they did what any self-respecting big brand would do, they wrote a press releasel aunched a branded swimwear line featuring … soup

From solo brands to indie brands to major brands—everyone is getting in on the merch game. 

And it’s not just the low-end of the food chain. Brands ranging from your once-a-day Dunkin’ to your once-in-a-blue-moon Ritz Carlton are raging about merch. 

Example? If you’re a Fortnite fan, you can play the game for free, but if you want a Fortnite+Balenciaga t-shirt, you’ll have to shell out $475 for it unless, of course, you prefer the $725 hoodie

And the collabs (oh, so many collabs):

Justin Bieber x Tim Hortons merch.

Chipotle x Carhartt merch.

Popeye’s x Megan Thee Stallion merch.

McDonalds x pretty-much-everyone merch (BTS, J, Balvin, Saweetie, etc.) 

Ten years ago, if you dropped someKFC crocs on your audience, you’d inherit a kingdom: pallets upon pallets of patriarchy who rule the warehouse forever because they ain’t budging a damn inch. But today, KFC merch flies.

And speaking of patriarchy, Taylor Swift broke records with her new album Red and the longest song to hit #1 (‘All Too Well’) as swifties flocked to buy out the stock of the famous “F— the Patriarchy” key chain mentioned in the lyrics (as well as virtually every piece of Red merch on her site). 

In fact, “band merch,” long a staple of the music business, has recently exceeded even its own bounds: Kanye’s ‘DONDA’ event broke records for the highest-grossing US tour in history based solely off of merch sales

And streetwear examples abound. Kith and Madhappy, two upstart streetwear brands eyeing the Supreme empire, both dropped branded “Curb Your Enthusiasm” collections

Let’s not forget gazillionaires like Elon Musk, who continues to use merch to provoke just about everybody (his latest: the Tesla Cyberwhistle). 

Authors are in on it too. Salley Rooney (hailed as the first great millennial novelist) announced her third novel through influencer kits, sent to folks like Lena Dunham and Lucy Dacus. Her new book included an entire merch roll-out campaign, complete with umbrellas, t-shirts, bucket hats, and tote bags. 

And speaking of totes: How about that New Yorker Tote bag? The one so hot it’s now in the hands of over half-a-million people (and counting), the tote that became more of a status symbol than a $10,000 Hermés bag, the tote so damn popular that it led Vice writer, Sam Wolfson, to pen this clever homage

“Famous tote bag company The New Yorker has become so successful that they also now produce a weekly magazine filled with investigative journalism, restaurant reviews and satirical essays.”

(Brilliant).

But perhaps most astonishing is how the worlds of streetwear and fashion have elevated branded merch to, not just a new level, but an entirely new game. When White Castle celebrated its 100th birthday, they enlisted Liberian-American fashion designer Telfar Clemens (whose brand Telfar is upending the fashion world for its inclusive stance and brilliant designs) to design their uniforms, which include all unisex designs of T-shirts, polos, aprons, visors, and do-rags. (Shout-out to our very own Telfar-obsessed Aly Brunton who noted this for us). 

Merch has become so popular that books are even being written about it. A24 films released a book celebrating a boom era of promotional movie merchandise, and the famous Japanese writer Hauraki Murakami, whose book sales exceed 2.5 million copies, recently released a new book celebrating his favorite t-shirts.  

If you haven’t noticed, the world of branded merchandise is in the middle of one of the biggest evolutions since Michael Vasilantone created a multi-color garment printing machine in 1960 to screenprint slogans on t-shirts. 

Over the past few years, virtually every major publication, from Forbes to The New York Times, has written about merch. Sometimes it’s negative, such as the Fast Company article written by our friend Liz Segran, It’s time to stop spending billions on cheap conference swag. (After Liz’s article, commonskuresponded and also asked Liz to join us for a podcast chat and as aguest speaker at skucon). 

Or, articles like The New York Times report, The Cotton Tote Crisis (“How did an environmental solution become part of the problem?”). An article published by the very same New York Times that sells not only one branded tote on their site but twothreefourfivesixseveneightnineteneleventwelvethirteenfourteen different tote bags. 

[Sidenote: There are touchpoints in those articles we (and many conscientious sellers in the merch business) agree with, such as the abuse of wasteful, mindless spending and its harm to our environment, which we will address in subsequent posts].

But it seems we notice and react to negative news (understandably) more so than realizing the revolution happening right under our nose. 

Branded merch is not just ubiquitous, it has become a cultural staple evolving to a higher form of identity, self-expression, and art, commanding headlines and sparking brand obsession like never before. 

The positive news about merch vastly outweighs the negative. Articles abound, such as If You Notice Branded Merch Everywhere, You Are Not Alone—Here Is Why (Forbes); What Your T-Shirt Says About You (The Atlantic); How Supreme-Style Merch Drops Took Over Corporate America(Medium); Why Does This Simple Hat, Worn by Emily Ratajkowski and TimothéeChalamet, Keep Selling Out? (Vogue).

An exercise: Take a hobby of yours, any passion you have, and see if you can’t google a merch connection. Own a Peloton? Merch. Ted Lasso fan? Merch. Even a book-nerd like me can make a merch connection. Recently, I resubscribed to The New Yorker just so I could get the swanky new green tote bag, and I noticed that The Paris Review dropped a merch line just so this idiot could shell out ten times the cost for a T and a tote. See? Merch. It’s a brilliant exercise to see, not only how far merch has come, but how impactful merch is for every single brand

Anna PaczkowskaThe Branded Merch Revolution Happening Right Under Your Nose
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Crisis or Opportunity?

China is a manufacturing powerhouse. Known as “the world’s factory,” China is the world’s largest manufacturer in terms of output. The country’s GDP reached $17.7 trillion in 2021, up $3 trillion from 2020. This year, China is targeting to grow another 5.5%.  

Outside of textiles, nearly every promotional product comes from China—or has components from the country. China’s speed, low labor rates and strong manufacturing capabilities have made it a global manufacturing hub and the go-to source in the promotional products industry. 

China is the world’s second-largest economy behind the United States and its most populous nation with 1.4 billion people. But the country is changing rapidly. So is the relationship between China and the U.S.—and China and the world.

Is the promotional products industry ready for what comes next?

Tumultuous Times

Doing business in one of the world’s most dynamic countries has become increasingly complicated. First came the China tariffs in 2018, leading the world’s two largest economies to engage in a bitter trade war. Some economists say the U.S.-China trade war could go on for years. 

The United States currently imposes a 25% tariff on approximately $250 billion of imports from China and a 7.5% tariff on approximately $112 billion worth of imports from China, according to the Tax Foundation. Chinese tariffs on American products are about 20%. Before the U.S.-China trade war, U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods were on average 3.1%, while China’s tariffs on American goods were about 8%.

While meant to punish China for its unfair economic policies, the tariffs that were started by the Trump Administration ended up harming the U.S. Multiple studies have shown that U.S. importers and consumers have primarily paid for the tariffs.

"We're paying the bill and it's hurting our earnings" - quoteBen Zhang, president and CEO of Greater Pacific, says his company builds the tariff into the prices he charges distributors. His distributor clients then do the same with their end-buyer clients. “Who eventually pays the price? Not China factories—American businesses,” Zhang says. “We’re paying the bill, and it’s hurting our earnings. We’re suffering.”

After the tariffs came COVID-19, causing economies to grind to a halt. Since the beginning of the pandemic in 2020, China has instituted a strict zero-Covid policy to crush outbreaks and chains of transmission. The central government enforces large-scale lockdowns, mass testing and international travel bans as part of its zero-Covid strategy. 

China’s strict approach over the past two years has created numerous bottlenecks in the global supply chain, with factory shutdowns and logistics closures. However, experts doubt the country will change its strategy. In March, China locked down tens of millions of people as it experienced its largest Covid outbreak in two years. With the world seemingly turning a corner on the pandemic following the Omicron variant’s global spike this winter, China’s shutdown affected 19 provinces, including Shenzhen, which is key to supply chains because of its ports.

In the wake of the debilitating trade war and pandemic came supply chain snarls that entangled the world. Every aspect of the global supply chain was upended, from the factories manufacturing items to the cargo ships to transport the goods to backlogs at ports to unload the shipments. 

Zhang says that while it used to take about a week to get freight once it arrives in the port, it may now take months. And once a shipment clears customs, there may not be a truck driver to transport the goods. This leads to a domino effect. Suppliers like Greater Pacific can’t bill distributors for undelivered freight. Distributors can’t bill their clients. And end buyers purchasing promotional products must wait several months—time they often don’t have—to get their goods in hand. 

Companies shipping products from China are shelling out substantially more than they did pre-pandemic. Zhang says that a typical 40-foot container from China used to cost $3,000-$4,000, but now costs anywhere from $18,000-$25,000. “It’s unbelievable, but we have to pay it. We have no choice,” he says.

Brennan Mulligan, founder and CEO of California-based Skyou, has never seen anything like it. “Everybody says it’s unprecedented, but it applies in this case,” he says. “Everyone was blindsided.”

Pivoting To Closer Shores

Anna PaczkowskaCrisis or Opportunity?
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Industry Reaction: Corporate Gifting Market May Be Much Larger Than Previously Known

According to a recent study conducted by Coresight Research, corporate gifting has swelled to previously unrealized levels since the onset of the pandemic in early 2020.

A 2018 estimate placed the market at $125 billion, but the newer study finds it to be far more robust, an estimated $242 billion in 2021, and likely to swell to over $300 billion by 2024.

Naturally, promotional products distributors and suppliers specializing in corporate gifts are excited to hear the updated estimates, and say the new numbers are reflective of the uptick in business they’ve experienced since many office workers began to perform their duties remotely starting in the initial quarantine period, leaving their employers seeking ways to keep them feeling engaged and appreciated.

“During COVID, companies were trying to stay connected with staff,” says Pat Barry, executive vice president of sales at Austin, Texas-based distributor Boundless. “That has continued with a greater emphasis as companies are now are looking to retain staff and attract new employees due to record low unemployment.”

The new estimate comes from a survey of 300 corporate gift buyers across companies up to $30 billion in revenues. “The first thing we set out to do was determine the actual size of the corporate gifting market,” Kevin Payne, vice president of corporate marketing at study sponsor GiftNow, told Forbes. “We felt it was bigger than previous estimates, but how much bigger we didn’t know. We also believed it grew extremely fast over the past year and the study confirmed it. Corporate gifting is growing faster than the rest of the gifting market.”

The study was conducted in May and released in June. It includes ample information relevant across the entire promo industry, including gifting trends and key data on the purposes of corporate gifts and the types of gifts most frequently sought.

Corporate Gifting Infographic

Distributors say the remote work trend and rising transience in the workforce have increased the importance of gifts being particularly thoughtful, rather than compulsory or routine.

“Overall, our clients are using moments to unleash the power of human connection and deepen their relationships, which in turn increases retention,” says Hillary Feder, MAS, president of Hopkins, Minnesota-based distributor Hillary’s. “Two years ago, people just wanted to get something into their employees’ or clients’ hands to say ‘I am thinking of you.’ Today, we are working more strategically with them to step back and look at the big picture.”

Both Boundless and Hillary’s won PPAI Pyramid Awards for exceptional gifting programs in 2021.

“A thoughtful corporate gift includes knowing where people are, where their heads are at, what is keeping them up at night,” Feder says. “There is a ‘thinking investment’ to land on the right products. You need to know your client, their company brand, values, culture and voice. Know who will be the recipients—it is not one-size-fits-all, even in bulk gifting. It might mean a couple of different options if you are going to implement authentically and with heart.”

As for the specific items corporate gifters are looking for, gift cards—both physical and digital—lead the way, making up 37% of all gifts, with 51% of study participants including gift cards in their programs. Everyday branded products, gift baskets, edibles and apparel still represent large segments of the marketplace, but electronics and elevated branded merchandise are on trend. Barry says clients are looking for “brands, brands, brands.”

Anna PaczkowskaIndustry Reaction: Corporate Gifting Market May Be Much Larger Than Previously Known
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More Manufacturing Slowdowns as Chinese Factories Face Power Plant Shutdowns, Electricity Rationing

Chinese factories have been working hard to keep up with global demand as they recover from complete COVID-related shutdowns in China’s manufacturing sector, both earlier in the pandemic and more recently.

sixtwentysixMore Manufacturing Slowdowns as Chinese Factories Face Power Plant Shutdowns, Electricity Rationing
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A Gift Still Worth Giving

The end of this year may be unlike anything we’ve seen before, but don’t give in! It’s more important than ever to show employees and customers that they’re appreciated.

Year-end celebrations are meant to commemorate all the good times and successes of the past year. But clearly no one’s in a mood to celebrate all that’s happened in 2020. “We’re traumatized,” says a chief strategy officer for marketing, sourcing and compliance at a Top 40 distributor in Los Angeles. “We’ve been through a lot. We haven’t been connected, we haven’t been together.”

The fourth-quarter gifting season has always been promo’s time to shine. Distributors and suppliers could count on the rush of end-of-year orders to lock in a successful, profitable year. This year? There’s only uncertainty. Of course, there’s the looming specter of prolonged shutdowns that have crippled business for months.

But what will those year-end celebrations look like – if there are any at all? Without in-person events, how will companies recognize and show their appreciation to hardworking employees and customers who weathered There are ways to do it, say distributors and suppliers, and it’s important that gifting and recognition still take place, especially this year. Yes, customers’ budgets have been slashed, so distributors will need to tap into their creativity, sourcing connections and long-term relationships with suppliers to help end-buyers find solutions challenging situations this year and stuck by them? Promo can help companies connect their employees and prepare for 2021

Two Little Words: ‘Thank You’

With health and business challenges and slim budgets, who feels like celebrating? While it’s sure to be scaled back and more conservative than previous years, gift-giving this year will play a critical role in acknowledging, recognizing and thanking people. If 2020 taught us one thing, it’s that we’re more than employees or clients; we’re people, with real human concerns. A little gift to say thank you goes a long way.

A director of national accounts at a Top 40 distributor in Sterling, IL is starting to help clients with appreciation gifts for their employees. “They worked through the pandemic, took pay cuts and went on furlough, while staying loyal and often doing things outside their job description to help keep the business going,” he says. “Recognition and retention will be big topics this year.”

In years past, high-end awards for star employees and donors dominated the Q4 gift scene. This year, without in-person events, recognition and thank-you gifts will be smaller and more utilitarian, much of it drop-shipped to private homes as custom kits or “parties in a box.”

“Trophies are really for recognition in front of peers,” says Rena Ashfeld, vice president of sales at Webb Company, Eagan, MN. “We’re not going to see ceremonies, cocktail parties or dinners, but people will appreciate high-value, useful items at many different price points.”

It’s definitely going to be a different feel from past fourth quarters. But it’s also an opportunity for end-buyers to comfort their recipients and let them know they’re there for them and appreciate their hard work.

“We’re going to need the human dynamic,” says Greg Armstrong, vice president of sales at Evans Manufacturing in Garden Grove, CA. “Gifts need to be impactful, thoughtful and utilitarian, with high perceived value. Don’t give out something like clocks that will just sit on a mantle, and recognize that companies might not be able to afford name-brand wireless speakers for everyone.”

Marketing budgets may be slashed significantly, but it’s up to distributors to make sure clients know how important it is to reach out to their employees and customers with gifts that can serve them at this difficult time. “We’re not going to have parties, but it’s still very important that companies send out something to their people,” says Abergel. “Promo connects people.”

No Place Like Home

As reopening plans were made, implemented and then rolled back in some states this summer, people slowly realized that a return to normalcy was going to take a long time. For many, homes were their safe havens in the midst of the storm.

While $100 trophies and name-brand wireless speakers may be off the table this year, companies can still show appreciation with gifts for home use, usually at affordable price points. “We’re now working, playing and overall living at home more,” says a distributor in Maple, ON. “It’s up to distributors to present unique ideas that might not have been typical options in the past but are totally relevant now.”

Despite fears of slashed marketing budgets, food gift supplier Maple Ridge Farms in Mosinee, WI, is up 50% year-over-year, because of remote work, a lack of dining out and a few smaller reopening celebrations. President Tom Riordan says they’re fulfilling more orders for cheese and sausage packages than he can ever remember. He expects dining in and family sharing of food gifts to remain popular through the fourth quarter, and smaller items will be used as teasers for virtual parties and year-end meetings.

“Almost all of our customers think their Q4 business from 2019 will repeat,” says Riordan, anticipating repeat business this holiday season but with smaller orders. “Over the past 10 years, there’s been a shift from sending items to residences to sending them to offices for workers to share. That will flip big time this year.”

Now, people want a change of scenery after months of stay-at-home orders, but aren’t yet ready to board flights. That means more road trip and camping items will soon be in demand. “People want to be safe, but they want to get out of the house,” says Abergel. “Items won’t be at the same price points as previous years, but we’ll take the same care with it.”

Another option: “Experience” gift bundles that give recipients a taste of a destination without having to leave the couch. Was a client’s incentive trip to Puerto Rico canceled this year? Put together a kitted box with personal care items, fun sunglasses, barware, towel and tote. It’s not the same as actually going, but it’ll get attendees pumped for the 2021 event.

Think home exercise apparel and equipment and cooking accessories, for starters. Starline in Grand Island, NY has a wide array of kitchen tools, such as bowls, tongs, spatulas, serving spoons and bamboo cutting boards. “This is the year of cooking and dining in,” says Brian Porter, Starline’s senior vice president of sales and marketing. “We’ve seen steady order increases week-over-week.” He says other “universal use” items, like tech accessories, are great for sharing with significant others and kids.

Workers Near & Far

When employees were first told to go home and set up shop in their dining rooms, no one knew exactly how long it would be before seeing their co-workers in person again. Now, it seems it might not be before the end of the year, and maybe not until Q1 2021. That means employees will continue to need work-from-home items, even if they’re on newly implemented flexible home/office schedules.

Sheng Kuo, principal at KLM Promo Products in West Covina, CA, says good quality branded headsets would be appreciated for virtual meetings, especially if the ones recipients have been using look worse for wear after more than six months of near-daily use. He says companies are also looking for desk items like wireless device chargers with UV sterilizing cases.

For those venturing out of the house more often as restrictions lift, consider stylus pens for transaction screens and ATMs, no-touch tools and bag holders to avoid contact with floors.

Ahead of virtual year-end events, companies can distribute gifts to employees in the office and drop-ship them to those still working remotely. “It adds a personal touch and promotes team spirit,” says Kuo.

For companies with a little more to spend, custom sales specialist Eleanor Turner of Cufflinks Inc. (asi/47838) says cufflinks, ties and scarves are ideal for virtual holiday parties and then as permanent wardrobe pieces for virtual sales calls. “All of our items are used from the waist up,” she says. “There’s a novelty to them and they’re personal items the team can use. They bring comfort and remind everyone that we’re all in this together.”

Meanwhile, welcoming back employees to shared workspaces is slowly starting and is expected to continue ramping up for the rest of 2020 and into 2021. Q4 gifts can help prepare everyone for the transition.

Webb Company has been doing more kitting than ever before. “Kitting is our go-to moving forward,” says Ashfeld. “It’s interactive and tangible.” The supplier is putting together bundles of PPE and promo customized to each client’s needs. “We’re including no-touch keys and drinkware,” she says. “We’re also combining tech accessories with personal care products like lip balm and sanitizer. We’ve made things easier by offering a black gift box with an in-house printed label. It’s got a subscription box feel and it makes people happy. And then we can drop-ship to homes.”

Clients can also help returning employees maintain a healthy distance by giving them personalized items, which not only adds an appreciated touch to the piece, but also mitigates accidental sharing.

Personalization is normally used with about 10% of orders at Starline, says Porter. It’s now about 50%. “They’re looking for personalized coolers in particular,” says Porter. “Employees won’t be able to commune in breakrooms, so this helps avoid gathering and use of the fridge. Then they can still bring their lunch and eat healthy because they’re not going to the fast food place down the street. Plus, with temperature checks at the door, leaving for lunch and coming back will be a pain.”

An appreciation gift will have even more impact this year if there’s a built-in health and safety aspect. “We can help people feel safe coming back to work,” says Silseth. “Whether it’s PPE or showing them how valuable their role is, there are opportunities we can propose to clients to help them with comforting their people.”

Q4 Challenges Compounded

With a flurry of orders and clients coming to distributors late in the game, the fourth quarter is traditionally a trying one, particularly when it comes to inventory levels. This year, the quarter will have its own unique challenges.

To start, many end-buyers will have a hybrid of in-office and remote gift recipients. To meet demand, promo companies will have to be nimble to offer clients the smoothest gift experience possible. Drop-shipping, for example, is a must-have this year. “Say a company has 600 remote workers,” says Armstrong. “How do you get gifts to them? They can’t all stop by on December 23 to pick them up. That would be chaotic, so you deliver them to people’s doorsteps.”

Many factories are now offering extended services in drop-shipping, kitting, warehousing and curbside pick-up. “We’ve always offered these things, but it was mostly for our larger national clients,” says President & CEO Sam Singh. “Now, everyone needs them. In Q4, we’ll be ramping them up to offer a frictionless experience.”

Keep lead-times in mind as well. This year, the persistent problem of COVID-related supply chain disruption complicates an already busy gift season known for fluctuating inventory levels. Riordan at Maple Ridge Farms said they had to expedite a few meat orders because of facility closing concerns, and lead-times on gift towers lengthened considerably recently after the cardboard supplier was shut down for several weeks. “Disruption could also spike prices, sometimes between 25% and 30%,” he says. “Clients should be ordering twice as early.”

But arguably, the most daunting challenge will be reduction in client budgets. End-buyers say they just don’t have the money to give out gifts this year. Distributors should be sensitive to financial challenges while also offering to help clients get creative with fewer dollars at their disposal.

Singh says two kinds of spend will dominate Q4 sales: Higher-end products for a smaller group of recipients (what he calls a “narrow and deep strategy”), and higher volumes of lower-priced items to get them into more people’s hands and keep their brands top-of-mind. Think pens, ceramic mugs and water bottles, he says. Clients might still be thinking in terms of $100 gifts. Tell them $10 to $15 will still get them something worth giving, says Abergel, even if it’s just drinkware, a blanket or comfy socks with a card or note.

Don’t forget to use available budget from canceled end-of-year parties. “Our national sales meeting isn’t happening,” Porter adds. “The $50-$60 in overhead for each attendee is going to Q4 promo for our people.”

Ashfeld says she’s quoted a variety of gift bundles from $15 net (a vacuum tumbler with candy inside) to $50 net. “I’d say the sweet spot for gifts this year is in the $10 to $30 range, including the products, imprint and packaging,” says Armstrong. “Companies aren’t going to do $50 to $100 a person.”

It’s been an unforgettable year, but for all the wrong reasons. Now, it’s up to distributors and their supplier partners to help clients end the year on a positive note with an affordable token of gratitude. “Showing appreciation is at an all-time premium right now,” says Armstrong. “Companies need to say to their employees and clients: ‘Thank you for enduring and sticking by us.’”

The right gift at the right price not only recognizes employees and clients after a long, difficult year, but also boosts morale for the next. “Gifts will keep everyone connected and ready for 2021,” says Abergel. “We’re all going to have to start building business up again and getting back on track.”


TARGET DEMOGRAPHIC: HOMEBODIES – Stay-at-Home Order
With restaurants and bars either closed, takeout-only or at reduced capacity, 2020 has become the year of cooking at home. Think kitchen items with high perceived value, such as cutting boards, utensils, spatulas, spice racks, and even bowls and strainers. Send an eco-friendly message with items made of sustainable bamboo. And look to food gift suppliers for meat and cheese packages that would pair perfectly with cheese boards, or for sweet items that make for an excellent after-dinner treat for the family.
TARGET DEMOGRAPHIC: HOMEBODIES – A Little R&R
Weekends used to be filled with personal care appointments and trips to the movie theater, but now people are staying close to home and watching streaming services. Movie-themed food gifts will be appreciated among end-users, along with spa items like bath salts, slippers and soft robes. Whether it’s a DIY face mask or movie night with the whole family, soft blankets are an ideal addition for the colder winter months. They can also double as a little extra warmth for the home office. For those planning to have small, distanced get-togethers at home to celebrate the end of 2020, think wine marker sets to help guests avoid accidental sharing.
TARGET DEMOGRAPHIC: VIRTUAL WORKERS – Going and Staying Virtual
We’re not out of the woods yet. Many companies plan to keep employees safe by prohibiting company air travel and asking everyone to continue in their remote setups for the foreseeable future, perhaps even into 2021. That means they’ll need accessories, particularly “waist-up” ones, for virtual meetings and client calls. Consider a custom tie, pocket square and cufflinks as a sophisticated set. They’ll make a nice impression on video calls and will continue to be used when in-person meetings start back up. Custom cufflinks – like these depicting the famous Japanese woodblock print “The Great Wave Off Kanagawa” – would be ideal gifts for patrons who continued supporting museums and endowments this year.
TARGET DEMOGRAPHIC: HYBRID WORKFORCES – Out & About Again
Items that encourage good health practices – whether while running errands or spending time in the workplace again – will be appreciated by recipients in Q4. Consider branded masks and sanitizer bundled with hard goods, and don’t forget no-touch keys for opening doors. Styluses are ideal for transaction terminals, ATMs and gas tanks, and a UV sterilizer case keeps devices clean during the day. Health and safety items say the giver cares about the recipient’s wellbeing, appreciates them and wants them to stay healthy for the long-haul.
TARGET DEMOGRAPHIC: HYBRID WORKFORCES – Sharing (at Home) Is Caring
Even with some workers heading back to the office, the days of sharing food gifts in the conference room are still a long way off. Consider smaller individual edible gifts (like candy bundled with a hard good or PPE) for desks and shipped to remote workers, as well as larger gift towers ideal for drop-shipping, to be taken home and shared with family members. Even if most or all employees are back in the office, close gatherings with shared refreshments still aren’t in the cards yet. Consider including a note with the gift encouraging everyone to take their food home to share in one household.
TARGET DEMOGRAPHIC: VIRTUAL WORKERS – Home Technology
Those continuing virtual work have been putting their devices and tech accessories through their paces since March. Some are most likely starting to wear out with heavy use (especially when shared with the kids). Consider fresh tech accessories that will keep workers connected from their home offices into the new year, like power banks, charging cases, web cam covers, speakers, headsets for video calls and earbuds. This wireless pair comes with a convenient charging case and cable, so users can easily make and take calls, and listen to music or podcasts without bothering roommates and family members.

Reprinted From ASI Central News, By Sara Lavenduski

sixtwentysixA Gift Still Worth Giving
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